“Return to Sender, Web Address Unknown!” AKA Adventures in Social Media Marketing.

Wow, it’s week fourteen, and my Social Media Marketing class is over. I have learned so much. This is the way to go, in business. It is targeted, clever and effective, all the analytics say so. Nothing left to do, but get back on Twitter. Oh yeah, it is also affordable. Anybody can do it and should. But wait, does it work? How much money did I actually make on my activity?

ROI1

(Cartoon Money Clip Art)

Ultimately, if you are in business, you are there to make a profit. The final goal, make money, pay your bills, mortgage, etc. So, you better make sure your social media marketing efforts have paid off. This week’s lesson, the final one, is called “Social Media Marketing-ROI.” ROI (return on investment) is the ultimate analytic; no matter how well your marketing is doing, if it isn’t making the cash register ring, it isn’t worth it.

(Wise, 2017)

It was explained, that to determine ROI, you first have to understand the link between business strategy and Social Media. Strategy is a long-term plan of action to achieve a goal. Our instructor talked about “Ansoff’s Matrix.”

 Four strategies:

  • Market penetration: sell existing products to existing customers.
  • Product development: sell new products to existing customers.
  • Market development: expand into new markets.
  • Diversification: sell new products to new people.

(Ansoff)

Next, you need to understand your analytics as they pertain to your strategies. Which posts worked, which has the most impact, which posts were SMART?

Specific

Measurable

Achievable

Relevant

Time related

Yeah, a smart way to remember what SMART is. Next, you want to think of your objectives. What are you going to do on Facebook, or Twitter, or whichever social media platform you use? When, how much and to whom? And what do you want to accomplish? Be specific, be real. You want to sell more, is probably too general. You want to sell 10% more, now that is measurable. It’s important to have reasonable objectives and a time frame. It is hard to determine ROI because you never know when a like, turns into something tangible.

ROI2

(John Atkinson)

We can’t forget vanity metrics. The likes, they feel so good; they are very rewarding and, according to the instructor, mean nothing when it comes to business. The metrics that matter are measurable. That seems harsh, but I get it. If it doesn’t result in more sales then maybe, I am just playing. So someone needs to hire me to do a safety video, now. That way I can justify spending seven hours on Facebook yesterday.

ROI3

(Yankelovich)

With social media marketing, it is quality over quantity. Your message needs to stick and motivate action. Here are some metric terms that you need to know: volume metrics are important because it tells us how far our content circulates, while still reaching a qualified audience.

Most platforms help with determining your ROI. For example, to determine reach on Twitter, take the total number of followers that get your posts, and divide by the number of followers that were on Twitter at the time of your post, and that equals reach, or impressions.

Amplification can be determined by taking the number of shares or retweets and dividing them by number of posts over a period of time. Engagement is to attract interest. Social Media is a two-way dialogue, so never forget to talk. Applause lets you know how many people are sharing your message. You can quickly figure out which content is the most popular and then can share more of the same. There is analytics on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn. Again I reiterate explore other people’s profile, even competitors; it will help you determine the content you want to share.

This almost seems like a recap, but it isn’t, it is important to understand how each platform is performing, to come up with a realistic ROI.

Let’s define ROI. It is the value you receive from your social media investment. Are you making a profit or fair return? You have to keep in mind that Social Media Marketing will take a great deal of time, so you need to consider this, as well. Don’t forget to have a system to explain the unknowns. For example, I can determine my ROI and think, this isn’t as good as I was hoping, but when I take into consideration that the province has been in a recession for the past three years, it may not look so bad.

To determine ROI, you first need to know the revenue that was generated from a specific campaign, subtract the cost, then divide by the cost. I have to use the instructor’s example here because I don’t have enough relevant data yet to do my own. So let’s say you have 1,000 clicks from 10 social media campaign posts on Twitter. Of those 1,000, 500 became leads, and 100 made a purchase. This is to say that, the traffic to leads ratio is 50% and leads to sales is 20%.

You know when someone buys your product or service it is worth $100.00, the cost of the campaign is $500.00, and the campaign generated $10,000.00. The ROI is 19 to 1. For every dollar spent you made nineteen.

Keep in mind, this is based on a financial ROI and doesn’t take into consideration non-financial benefits, such as goodwill, brand awareness and loyalty. These can’t be quantified by money made.

This was probably the least enjoyable lesson in the course, but maybe the most valuable. As an artist, I often struggle with business. It isn’t my natural leaning, so I have to work at it. I feel a little more confident going forward now. So watch out for Hired Gun, I will be landing in your feed shortly.

I will be taking a blog break over the holidays, but watch for my new posts in the New Year. It is time to take what I have learned and turn it into mesaurable marketing activities that help my business and my bottom line.

Happy Holidays!

 

 

Ansoff, I. (n.d.). Ansoff’s Matrix.

Cartoon Money Clip Art. (n.d.). Retrieved from Clipart Library: http://clipart-library.com/clipart/1114433.htm

John Atkinson, W. H. (n.d.). Social Media.

Wise, L. (2017, 1 12). Social Media Marketing-ROI. Retrieved 12 11, 2017, from Lynda.com: Lynda.com

Yankelovich, G. (n.d.). Vanity Metrics.

 

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“Penny for your thoughts!” AKA Adventures in Social Media Marketing!

What do you think of, when you hear the word leadership?

[lee-der-ship]

  • Examples
  • Word Origin

See more synonyms on Thesaurus.com

Noun

the position or function of a leader, a person who guides or directs a group:

He managed to maintain his leadership of the party despite heavy opposition.

 

(Dictionary.com)

Online, everyone has the opportunity to be a thought leader. Someone who is an authority on a certain subject can use that status and call themselves an expert. Experts develop influence and, once you become an influencer your digital presence becomes larger, and your success as a business grows.

“Thought Leadership” was the first part of this week’s lesson. We learned about becoming the go-to person for your business. The question isn’t if you have the expertise to offer, but rather what expertise do you have? (Crensha, 2012)

thoughtleadership4

(Barron)

You begin by coming up with three talents:

-What are you good at?

-What do you love doing?

-Where have you developed skills?

Then think of your MVA, your most valuable asset, and that is the skill you will likely get paid the most for. Now,  compare it with your three talents and see where the commonality is, look for matches.  It is these matches that will hopefully define your level and area of expertise. It also helps to have a mentor. Over my career, I can safely say, I have had four, possibly five mentors. I have always searched for people I thought might have something I could learn, and it has helped me.

The first part ofThought Leadership”, was how to become a leader within your own company.  One of the suggestions was becoming a systems expert. One of the key’s to being a leader is knowing a system well, and being able to teach it to other employees. You become more valuable, enjoying greater success within the company.

They suggest documenting the system through a series of questions; what, why, who, when and how much? I am not going to explain this in great depth because it feels quite self-explanatory. It’s an interesting concept, but since I am the only person in my company I have a hard time seeing the relevance to me. I can see the logic though. Being an expert in your company, will not only give you more job satisfaction, but it will also give you more job security.

The next part is up my alley, “Building Authority in Public.” So, how do you build authority in public? How do you become an expert? Are you one, because you say you are? Not really, you need to prove it. Build a following and go from there. Some suggestions to build a following; review products or services you are familiar with, actively comment on other blogs, do a blog, podcast or video, learn more and earn certifications.

Build social networks, if you build then you will be perceived as the leader. This is what I do with my many film pages.

It was also suggested to create offline social networks. What is an offline social network? Oh, wait, yeah, it’s coming back…this is when you hung out and talk to people over coffee! Eeeew, that now seems so barbaric, so 2001.

Up to this point, everything I have talked about is your ladder to success. Each rung is what you have done to push yourself to an end result, becoming an authority. You also need to create what they call a library, which is a resource of your own material that you can share. Plan to write articles, do videos, maybe a book. These are materials you share, that demonstrate your knowledge.

Their use becomes tangible evidence of expertise or as I see it, “Your Dudeness!”

Thoughtleadership2

(Generator)

You want to be sought out for your information, for the things you know; you will become a Thought Leader. You will have much more credibility, which in turn, makes you more valuable in the digital world.

The next part of the lesson was a chapter from the book “Groundswell,” called “The Groundswell Inside your Company.”

(Bernoff, 2011)

Large companies tend to be top down when it comes to corporate communications. A few companies have worked at harnessing the power of the groundswell within their organizations. In a nutshell, they have designed systems to be able to hear employee’s ideas and complaints, all the while empowering them to not only contribute but become brand ambassadors.

Best Buy built a listening group called “Blue Shirt Nation.” All employees can contribute ideas and discuss problems with the company.  Two marketing folks rolled it out grassroots, by first visiting stores and setting up meetings, where they would get employees comfortable with contributing. When they launched the website, employees jumped on board. These contributions not only came up with great ideas and solved problems, it also identified the thought leaders and rewarded them with promotions. Ultimately, when an employee feels that they and their thoughts are valued, they will become even more committed to company success.

One of the largest interactive agencies in the world razorfish, used Wikis to tap into the corporate groundswell.

wiki

[wik-ee]

Spell Syllables

  • Examples
  • Word Origin

noun, plural wikis.

  1. (sometimes initial capital letter) a website that allows anyone to add,delete, or revise content by using a web browser.

(Dictionary.com)

The CEO, just before Christmas blogged about his favourite guitar solo, it was a random non-business comment. Before long, the employees were responding to this with their thoughts. The idea is to empower employees, letting them know they could reach out and talk to the CEO, in a very human way. This empowerment allowed them to respond to blogs, write blogs, and it totally turned the top-down communication model, to a top down and back up again one.

Bell Canada, inspired by the show “American Idol,” developed a website called “ID-ah!” Employees were invited to submit ideas to better the company, and these were then voted on by other employees. And some of their ideas were implemented. It is this type of interconnectivity that the groundswell craves, so why not imbrace it and succed because of it.

I am a team leader on a film set and run the ship, but I never forget that film is a collaborative process, and any suggestion could be a good one so I listen to everyone.

As my course winds down, I am starting to see the interconnectivity of everything digital, and it all starts with social listening.

Thoughtleadership3

(Bailey)

I have one more lesson next week and it is called “Social Media Marketing ROI!”

 

Till next week!

 

Bailey, F. J. (n.d.). Frank James Bailey voice over blog.

Barron, B. (n.d.). How to establish yourself as an industry thought leard with wordpress.

Bernoff, C. L. (2011). The groundswell inside your company. In C. L. Bernoffr, Groundswell (pp. 233-249). Boston: Harvard Business School Publishin.

Crensha, D. (2012, 9 5). “Thought Leadership”. Retrieved 11 30, 2017, from Lynda.com: Lynda.com

Dictionary.com. (n.d.). Retrieved from Dictionary.com: http://www.dictionary.com/browse/leadership?s=t

Generator, M. (n.d.). Sam Elliot/Big Lebowski.

 

Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dumb: AKA Adventures in Social Media Marketing.

Another week, another lesson and another blog. This week’s topic is “Twitter for Business!” (Batosole, 2016)

300 million users a day, tells me there might be business opportunities here. The primary demographic is 18-29, with 30% of users being 35 and older. Twitter has the most post-secondary graduates, and the most users making over $50,000.00 per year. It’s a smart, affluent crowd! (Bernoff)

twitter7

(Baladi)

So what is Twitter all about? Conversations! It’s like a business mixer at the Economic Development Centre, where you have your glass a wine, strolling around groups of people, eavesdropping, listening for a conversation you know something about and want to interject. Twitter is a useful tool; you can share details on new products, talk about new things in your industry, voice opinions on topics and share interesting behind scene stuff of your business.

twitter8

(Pinterest)

You want to educate and engage with your current and potential customers. Twitter is real-time communication, with most of the interaction happening within the first hour of your post. It’s fast, 80% of users’ access twitters on their mobile.

twitter9

(Pinterest)

The main purpose of Twitter is to attractfollowers. All of your tweets end up in a follower’s timeline and your followers can interact with your posts in a number of ways. They can respond, like, retweet, quote retweet (make a comment about the retweet) or send a direct message (DM). Your timeline is made up of your tweets, and the tweets and posts of everyone you follow. When you look at your own timeline, Twitter will arrange the tweets from people you follow in the order of things you care about. “In the order of things I care about,” how do they know that?

twitter11

(Wikipedia)

Is that freaky or is it just me?

When you are starting out, you need to set up your homepage. This is a crucial part of your strategy. A first glance at your page could mean a follow or not. So it’s important to remember everything is made up of rich content. Your profile pic is a thumbnail that is placed beside all your tweets. It can be a logo, or perhaps a person who is part of the brand. Your header photo should be strong and depict what you do. I really like my profile picture, I feel it says it alltwitter10

(Babchishin)

Your bio should be short and sweet. You want the viewer to know exactly who and what your  brand is. It should be the reason people follow you. I’ve been told, the part of my bio that made them want to follow me, was Independent Filmmaker. Finally, if you have a favourite tweet, one that says it all, you can pin it, so it will always appear first on your timeline when people land on your profile.

You are now ready to tweet. But, there are a few things you might want to consider first. You might want to start collecting data. Find out what your competitors are doing, the good and bad. Follow influencers in your industry, and follow the right hashtags. As talked about previously you can use Hashtags to find conversations relevant to you. Start out with 10-15 accounts and start listening.

A point to remember with your tweets; you need to decide how you want to be perceived. I would like to be looked on as an expert in my field, which is content creation and social media. You need to be conversational; it is just chatting online and stop being so selly. Not sure if selly is a word, but it should be. You want a tiny bit of self-promotion but not over the top. Let your personality out. Be funny, light-hearted, and always keep this voice; when there are issues, you just change your tone.  Always be sharing rich content. Good photos and videos. I like behind the scene stuff, it seems to get the most traction for me.twitter12

(Babchishin)

Before you tweet, develop a goal, one main desirable. Each tweet will have its own objective, all driving to your one main goal. From this, you create a strategy. Don’t forget, every tweet should have a call to action; it could be learn more, follow me, retweet this or whatever you decide will drive users to conversion.

Once again, the four elements that equal shareable are; funny, helpful, newsworthy and inspiring.

From here, you need to decide how many times you plan to tweet, on which days, what kind of content you will share, and at what time. What is best, can all be determined with Twitter tools for measurement.

Twitter analytics, is where you find out what is working and when. You will have a 28-day view, and understanding your data is the key to success.  As mentioned before, there are search and advanced search. You can add a Twitter button to your website or blog. For that matter, I can even embed tweets on my blog. Alas, this is above my pay scale, and I will need the help of some tech-savvy friend for this one. You can also turn your entire timeline into an embedded widget, to place almost everywhere. The best part is that it is interactive no matter where you post it. This is something I will do, I just have to be patient, because those techies are a busy lot.

Next up is the Twitter Card.  In a nut shell, the Twitter Card is a reference. When you share other people`s content, Twitter recognizes the source and gives it the bibliography reference that is needed. All the information is stored on Meta tags, and once again my tech buddy is going to have to give me a bit of help. These Twitter Cards will help with all forms of content, it will even let you share Apps that a person can download.

Twitter also has an advertising platform which allows you to place ads in front of people you aren`t necessarily following, and they won`t appear on your timeline. You will need to set up a Twitter Ads Account. It is quite simple, you start with country, and time zone; add your credit card and billing info and you are good to go.

There are two types of advertising you can do. The first is a promoted account campaign. You are advertising your site and asking people to follow you. You are not trying to engage or convince the user to do anything but follow. You are first building a community. The first thing is to start the campaign and give it a name. Be very specific, because as you start to have success and do more and more campaigns, you will want to be able to recognize one at a glance. For example, if I was to do one, I could title it as follows: Hired Gun| follower campaign | Safety Manager | Interest: video | Alberta.

It is long, but there is no confusion on what I am doing.

You can totally customize, picking start and end times and then write a meaningful post. I have one in mind for Hired Gun, “Want to enhance your safety program? Follow me for insights, best practices and other information on the effective use of video!”

These ads don’t show up on your timeline, and Twitter recommends 3-5 tweets per campaign and don’t forget photos and videos.

twitter15

(Babchishin)

Also, you aren’t firing blindly, you pick your target. You can target age, gender, location, even language and make sure you aren’t targeting followers already. You can even target your competitors. Twitter doesn’t actually target your competitor’s followers but rather creates a profile of the type.  Now your budget, as you enter your numbers Twitter estimates your reach and you can adjust accordingly. Very much the way my Facebook experiment worked. Then you decide how much for each follow. Twitter suggests $3.00 per and is usually right on track. It is very similar to what I talked about in the Google Adwords blog, about pay per click. Finally, you decide your running schedule and you are off.

The second form of advertising is promoted  tweets. This is just like a regular tweet, the difference is you select the audience, and pay every time someone replies, retweets, favourites, or views your profile. Promoted tweets also have a flag icon that indicates it has been paid for

The two forms are very similar, but promoted tweets have two additions. You can target conversations around a specific TV show, and you can utilize keywords. As in the Google blog, these keywords come with the 4 matches, Broad, Phrase, Negative and Negative Phrase. I won’t define them again, but you can check out my Adwords blog to find out more.

Budgets are the same, you should start with the Twitter suggestion, and customize as you get data. Each campaign has its own set of metrics, so you can easily determine what is working and what isn’t.

As your followers start to grow, so does your activity. To keep track of it all there are tools to help. You can get email notifications that with the right filters can ensure you are responding appropriately and timely. Try and be on Twitter when your important followers are. How do you know this? Twitter analytics is how.

There are third-party tools like TweetDeck and HootSuite for Twitter, which can handle multiple accounts. Bufferallows you to store content to share later. Buffer can also be used with Facebook and LinkedIn.  Finally, check out Followerwonk, this app is used to generate leads by sourcing out the bios of users that you want to attract.

The book Groundswell offers five tips for maximizing results on Twitter:

  • Listen
  • Provide content that makes a difference not just promotes
  • Energize – find people that like what you have and amplify
  • Answer questions
  • Solve problems and embrace or engage in dialogues

twitter14

(Bernoff)

And before I go, Twitter is no longer just 140 characters; it has gone up to a whopping 280. Now you can wax poetic for twice as long.

Till next week!

Babchishin, B. (n.d.). Ben Babchishin/Twitter. Retrieved from Twitter: https://twitter.com/Benbabchishin

Baladi, N. (n.d.). Blog Baladi. Retrieved from http://blogbaladi.com/twitter-to-enable-280-characters-tweets/

Batosole, B. (2016, May 04). “Twitter for Business”. Retrieved November 24, 2017, from Lynda.com: Lynda.com

Bernoff, C. L. Groundswell. In C. L. Bernoff, Groundswell (p. 201). Boston: Harvard Business School Publishing.

Pinterest. (n.d.). Networking. Retrieved from Pinterest.

Wikipdedia. (n.d.). George Orwell. Retrieved from Wikipedia.

Wikipedia. (n.d.). George Orwell. Retrieved from Wikipedia.

 

 

 

 

“Sufferin Succotash, I think I saw a Tweety Bird!” AKA Adventures in Social Media Marketing.

We have come a long way from the days of the telegraph. Today Social Media is the new way to communicate. This week’s lesson is called “Social Media Marketing: Facebook and Twitter!” (Brad Batesole, 2016)

In general, we know a variety of things about Social Media Marketing:

  • It is conversations where we inform customers about our brand.
  • We encourage our customers to share our content and our story and become brand ambassadors. They do the marketing for us.
  • Getting our content shared increases our reach. One like can add hundreds of views by potential customers.
  • It allows us to hear from our customers about the good and the bad.
  • We can test ideas, depending on our level of activity add credibility.

Social Media Marketing is “Word of Mouth on Steroids!”

twitter6

(Blog) 

Facebook Vs Twitter. Facebook is a private network, where you share ideas with friends and family. The prime demographic is 25-50, the middle class with the highest percentage of users with a post secondary education. Engagement with a post can last for days.

Twitter on the other hand is public. It is real time and only 140 characters per post (this has since doubled to 280 characters). Twitter boasts 20% of the internet population, with a demographic of 18-29. 90% of Twitter engagement happens within the first hour.

I have been frittering around with Twitter for a few years now. I never used it properly, and I really don’t get its appeal. Perhaps this is because I am way outside the demo. For that matter, I am outside Facebook’s demo.

Huh, go with me here, what if I was able to come out with a social engagement platform that catered to the 50-Dead demo? Instead of sharing pics of our food, it would be colon pictures we get after the colonoscopy. I digress, perhaps more on this later.

Twitter, like all social media marketing, is dependent on analytics. You need to access this valuable Intel and it is easy enough with Google Analytics.

Remember your post has to be short, it is 240 characters, so concise is important. If you are sharing a URL then check out BITLY. They will use a process that shortens your URL.

240 million people daily visit Twitter to find topics that interest them, so potential is high. When you share content make sure what you are talking about is relevant to you and what you do. It is important to interact. Twitter claims that 72% of people are more likely to purchase what you are selling if you follow and interact with them.

Make sure the user name is relevant to your business and try and stay away from personal names, unless they are intricate with what you do.  A good place to start is your positioning statement, or your slogan. There are probably some great words there, remember keywords, because online it is all about being searchable.  I use my name because I am the only employee in Hired Gun and is the essence of what I do. You buy my services @Benbabchishin.

Be prepared, before you start tweeting  check out what other people are doing. What type of tweets does your competitors do? Follow hashtags, keywords and get a feel for what seems to work and what doesn’t.

Make sure you have a marketing objective. Develop communication guidelines, this helps you be consistent. Remember this is quick communication and you must adhere to the 4 Be’s:

  • Be Concise.
  • Be Transparent
  • Be Relevant
  • Be Accurate

Always add value and own up to your mistakes. One of the main goals of your tweet is the retweet. Shareable = funny, helpful, newsworthy or inspirational.

If one of your tweets gets re-tweeted, it opens you up to a much larger audience. Third party recommendation gives you credibility; someone sees value in your brand and feels confident to recommend you to their followers. This is how you go viral.

The number one rule of sales is a relationship, that is no different online. The right follower can put you in front of millions of people. Everything counts; one of those million people must need a training video, a marketing piece, or perhaps a commercial.

twitter1

(Babchishin)

These relationships are key to retweets. The right people, trends and relevance is also mandatory. You can also retweet other content; making sure you add your own context. You are now supplying your followers with different media and this just grows your credibility.

It is good to follow trends that are relevant to your brand. On your page, you will see a list of trends with hashtags you may want to follow. Just make sure they are legit, check them out first, before you actually follow them.

The retweet is kings. Here are some guidelines that will help find these quality followers:

  • Tweet often, every day, and make sure it is media rich content.
  • Tweet interesting things.
  • Join conversations and retweet content.
  • Follow hashtags.
  • Share your profile/username on other mediums.

Note that on twitter, you will be judged by who you follow, so be careful who you pick. (Sigh), yeah, okay, I unfollowed Porn Hub.

You are also looked down on, if you are following more than are following you.

twitter3

(Babchishin)

Hmm, my numbers are wrong, I need 37 follows to not be ostracized, so can you give a brother a break and throw a follow my way? Alas, I won’t be able to return the favour for a bit.

When you are searching for conversations, imagine you are in a place where there are numerous groups of people talking around the room. You stroll along, casually listening for some keyword, or a hashtag you like. When you find the right place, you interject and become part of the group, able to deliver information they all desire. There are not hashtags and keywords in real life conversations, but I am sure you get what I mean. You search out the relevant and insert yourself and your brand.

There are a lot of Twitter tools such as TweetDeck, a place you can customize your Twitter experience.

twitter5

(Twitter)

You can also use Hootsuite, or Buffer, which is good for managing active accounts. ifttt is a tool that will track mentions of you and send you an email.

Twitter is fast, public and transparent. Credibility is crucial and it is recommended that you stay away from the sites where you can buy followers. These are often fake accounts and can easily be found out.

Finally like Facebook, Twitter analytics can be converted into a spreadsheet.

That is it for Twitter this week. The other part of this week’s lesson is more Facebook. While not much new was discussed, I was reminded to download an app called Facebook Pages, this allows you run your Facebook business from your mobile.

There are differences between Twitter and Facebook. I understand Facebook now, but I am still sketchy on Twitter. Good thing next week’s lesson is “Twitter for Business!”

Till next week!

 

 

Babchishin, B. (n.d.). Ben Babchishin. Retrieved from Twitter: https://twitter.com/Benbabchishin

Blog, D. K. (n.d.). The merits of someone else s social turf.

Brad Batesole. (2016, 6 16). Lynda.com. Retrieved 11 18, 2017, from Social Media Marketing;Facebook and Twitter: Lynda.com

Twitter. (n.d.). TweetDeck. Retrieved from Twitter: tweetdeck.twitter.com

 

“What’s On Your Mind, Ben?” AKA Adventures in Social Media Marketing!

Over 1 billion active users, it boggles the mind; I can only be talking about one thing, a phenomena that has totally changed my world, and I suspect yours as well.

This week’s lesson is “Facebook for Business!” (Adams, 2016)

I’ve been on Facebook since 2005. I was an early adopter and I love it. Great connect, interact and enjoy friends. And now, as I have learned, it’s a great place to do business.

This is a tough blog to write because, even though I have learned a lot, much of it I already knew. So, I will speak in general terms.  First off, you will need to create a business page, which you open from your personal wall. In a column on the left side, near the bottom, is a key that says pages. Click on it, and it will take you to a list of all your pages. If this is your first page, it will be blank.

facebook1

(Ben Babchishinb/Facebook)

Now, top right, click on the green Create Page button and bam, you are off to the races, creating your own business page.

So why do you want a business page? Remember over a billion users. This is where you market your company and what you do. It is the full meal deal. You offer rich content, you engage with customers, you communicate, you listen.

Most of this week’s lesson was the mechanics of setting it up. I will not be talking about this but, rather the different things you can do, how you can advertise and the potential.

My page had been up and running for a few years, and I now was getting the opportunity to fine tune it, and make sure it was running at peak performance.

The first thing I did was create a call to action.

facebook2

(Ben Babchishinb/Facebook)

Right side, just under the photo, is a Call Now button. It used to just say button and I had the option to include a call to action such as; Call, book now and find out more. I hadn’t thought of that, and just assumed they would find my number if they needed it.  Then I created a user name @bbabchishin which can be searched and found outside of Facebook.

Once you are up and running, you can modify everything; what you post, when, who can post (these are known as administrators). You can add a Facebook like button on your website, there is a tool to help with that.

As we go along, the one thing the instructor mentioned and I blew a sigh of relief. Some of this could be beyond my skill set, and I might have to enlist the help of a tech savvy friend. No kidding.

So let’s start posting. What will you post, what will you say, what do you want to happen? We do now know that, organic posts no longer get the results they use too, and it is quite likely you will have to invest in some form of advertising. The ads are designed for success, you pick location, demographic, likes, and dislikes. You find your audience, and you provide them with valuable content about your business.

I decided to give it a try. Facebook suggested that, if I spent $5.00 a day, they predicted my page would get anywhere from 1-5 likes. I bit the bullet and bought 4 days, 20 dollars. Worst case scenario I get 4 likes, best 20, the cost, 20 bucks. In my defence, I wanted to use this information in this blog and I thought of it on Wednesday, November 8, and the blog is due Sunday, so yeah, 4 days was all I had, honest I wasn’t being cheap. The results will be featured at the end of this blog.

Rich content is king. When you post, make sure it is right, it looks good, and does what is intended. You can then use the tools on Facebook to target the right people; age, gender, location. Hashtags help with search ability. I mentioned the hashtags tool in my Instagram blog, so you might want to check that out.

Facebook allows you to create photo albums, a photo carousel will scroll images from a link you provide and you can create your own slide show. These are interesting ways to present your content. Personally, I still prefer the Ripl app I recently downloaded.

Instagram8

(Hired Gun Productions/RIPL, 2017)

If you have a favorite post you can pin it, so it always appears first on your page, otherwise it is sorted by date.

Whether you’re posting content, having an event, or sharing information, you can boost the reach of your endeavors with Facebook ads. You manage it all through Facebook’s Ads Manager, which also looks after advertising on Instagram.

Depending on your business type you can set up to receive rating and reviews.  Social Listening is important here. You need to be prepared to respond to questions and critiques, as well as say thanks to praise. Facebook is a social community. You have transparent communication; everyone can hear what is being said. Unfortunately, with all this transparency, you have to be on the lookout for trolls. Know that you can delete comments, and some can be reported to Facebook as abusive.

As you delve more and more into Ads on Facebook, you will be working in Ad’s Manager. There are three levels to Facebook’s ad structure;

-Campaigns

-Ad Sets

-Ads

The Campaign is where you determine your objective. There should be only one objective per campaign. When you determine the ads to run or ad sets you also decide the audience, placement, budget and schedule. The ads are just that, text and media.

At any time, you can click on Insights at the top of your page, and be taken to the Insight Dashboard.

facebook3

(Ben Babchishinb/Facebook)

You get a snapshot of the past 7 days. You can see likes, reach, page views, and the action that was taken on the page. You will see how different posts worked compared to others. They will even show the differences between your organic posts and the paid ones. Breaking it down further, analytics tells you the location of the person, age and device they were using. You really get a sense of what works and what doesn’t, and where you should put your ad money.

What is really nice is that, you can export all these insights onto a spread sheet. This can then be used with clients, at meetings or for your records.

There is also a message button on your page. Anyone can email you. Once you get the email, there are tools to categorize and prioritize them. It can really give you a leg up in customer relations, when you can find all interactions with a particular individual, in one place.  There is a lot more about messages that is above my head, but you can check out Facebook Fundamentals for that stuff. Don’t be afraid to search out help on Facebook, they have all the info you will need, right there.

And lastly, like your personal page, you will receive notifications, which is just a list of everything going on. If you are still waffling on whether or not you should advertise on Facebook, just note; I Googled Facebook ad revenues and found that they made a bit over 8 billion dollars, during the last quarter for 2016. That number tells me that people are successful with their Facebook ads; otherwise this number wouldn’t be so high.

Now my experiment, 5.00 a day, 4 days, Noon, November 8-Noon, November 12, and the results are… (Drum Roll).

facebook4

(Ben Babchishinb/Facebook)

They said in 4 days I would get anywhere from 4-20 likes. Small numbers, but with just a little effort I got 25 likes, way more than predicted.

On a personal note, I have taken Facebook Pages even further. I create a page for every film I am working on. That way the film becomes its own business. I am creating an audience for it, before I have begun. One of the films I am working on is a documentary titled, “Shawn Bernard-The Road to Redemption!” It’s a tragic story, so feel free to like the page. Feel free to watch the short DEMO we created for the project

(Babchishin, 2016)

My journey into Facebook isn’t over, next week is “Social Media Marketing: Facebook and Twitter.”

 

Till next week!

 

 

 

 

Adams, M. (2016, 8 3). Facebook for business. Retrieved 2017, from Lynda.com: http://www.Lynda.com

Babchishin, B. (Director). (2016). “Shawn Bernard-The Road to Redemption” [Motion Picture].

Ben Babchishinb/Facebook. (n.d.). Hired Gun . Retrieved 2017, from Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/?category=your_pages

Hired Gun Productions/RIPL. (2017, 11 2). Hired Gun is… Edmonton, AB, Canada.

 

“A Picture is worth a thousand words AKA Adventures in Social Media Marketing!”

Instagram1

 

(Kodak Instamatic X-15, 1970)

I remember as a kid, my folks bought me one of these for my birthday. It was the latest in technology. The flash cube rotated and you got four flashes from it. Totally styling and real cheap, it was the perfect camera.

I would shoot a roll of film, get them printed and display my work.

instagram2

(Horace Kepart, Hunter Library Special Collections)

I am sure you figured it out, this week’s lesson is “Instagram for Business!” (Alexander, 2016)

Instagram is a digital photo album and  quite amazing. The numbers are staggering; 500 million monthly active users, 95 million photos uploaded every DAY! And, 4.2 billion photo likes every 24 hours.  Yeah, perhaps there are some business opportunities here.

You and your business, have an opportunity to share rich media, high quality photos and video (60 seconds max) that show off your product, service or applications. There are so many things you can do.

Once again Keywords are important, because they are all searchable. This means write with purpose. Another way to find, or be found, is with hashtags. Instagram provides a page that lists the top hashtags, so go in and look for ones that match your business or product.

To setup you will need a business page on Facebook. In case you didn’t know, Facebook owns Instagram, and there is a fair bit of cross promotion. It is quite intuitive, but be sure and fill out everything on your profile, and start posting content.

Before you begin, the suggestion is to search companies you think might be doing a good job, and study what they do. Our instructor took us into Levis’ Instagram account and it looked fabulous. Great picture of people doing fun and exciting things, while wearing Levi’s.  It made me want to run out and buy a pair! Okay, maybe when it stops snowing.

When posting pictures, think outside of the box for some of them. Let’s use the example of a plumber. Images of a plumber aren’t always something you want to see.

instagram3

(Lamb)

But what about the end result? The plumbing crisis is over, and the family can once again enjoy clean, refreshing tap water.

Instagram4

(Tara Moore, Taxi, Getty Images, 2017)

A big part of Hired Gun’s (my company) work load is safety videos. I could post stills of safe work sites.

instagram5

(Babchishin, 2015)

As you decide how you want to approach Instagram, the suggestion was to brainstorm content ideas. Make a list of products and services and then the different ways your product and services can be used. The example we saw was for Chobani Yogurt. What they did was not only present their yogurt, but also the different things you can create with their yogurt. They even went so far as to provide recipes.

An idea I really liked, was to ask your customers to post photos of themselves using your product. Talk about being able to engage.

You should create a schedule for posts and stick to it. If you decide to post every Tuesday and Thursday, then that is what you have to do. By doing this, you increase user engagement. Your followers know when to expect new content, and they will look for it. It will be easier for you to plan and also consider themes. TBT (throwback Thursday) is big, maybe inspirational Monday, creative Tuesday, What it’s only Wednesday, Thursday not sure I can make it, and weee Friday!  You may want to come up with your own.

Theme days have proven to increase user engagement. This is starting to sound like a lot of work, but not to worry; there is an app for that. It is called ScheduGram, and it allows you to schedule all your posts and carry them out without you. You can set it up in a couple of hours, once a week, easy breezy!

So you have a plan, you have a theme, you are ready for the next phase, the exciting one, the phase we have all been waiting for…UPLOAD!  Time to start posting pictures or video. I am, at best, a mediocre photographer, but Instagram has the tools to help you with that. I just downloaded an app they recommend called Layout. It helps group pics together in collages.

I have gone kind of nutty with it. It is fun.

instagram6

(Ben Babchishin/Layout, 2017)

Whatever you do, there are tools to help maximize the impact. Once the photo is set, give it a caption and some context. The images above were taken while we filmed a music video for the woman on the right, Dale Ladouceur. You should tag the people in the shots, with the hope they will like, comment and/or share, which helps you reach more people. As comments come in, interact with people. It is all about Social Listening!”.

You can also upload video, but they have to be less than 60 seconds. I found another app that I really like called RIPL.  It allows you to edit together 8 stills of your choosing, add music and a sell banner that slides across. I would like to share what I created with you, but I am in the trial phase and can only upload to Facebook, twitter and Instagram. So I can’t put it into my blog until I upgrade from free to pay. There are so many apps out there, I really take my time before purchasing. If you are interested follow me on Instagram.

Instagram8

(RIPL/Ben Babchishin/Instagram, 2017)

You can modify easily, block inappropriate comments and add social media platforms and Hashtags.  Remember TopHashTags, it’s a good place to start.

You should also consider re-posting other people’s images, especially if you can add your own context to it. The easiest is to take a screen grab, but there are apps such as Insta Re-post for Instagram and Re-post for Instagram.  Make sure you credit the owner of the pic.

The analytics are easy to access and to the point. At the bottom of your post is a caption that states “View Insights.” You click on that and you see the number of likes, comments, impressions, reach, engagement and who has saved the image. It is an easy way to gauge success of each post.

Make sure you follow the Instagram Blog for business purposes. You will find case studies and tips for business using Instagram.  You can also buy ads that will place your posts on the walls of people that don’t follow you.  You can run campaigns on both Facebook and Instagram. You will have to use the Facebook Ad Manager and you need to have a Facebook Business Account. I will talk more of this in future blogs when we start delving into the world of Facebook.

Instagram will walk you through how to embed your posts on your website and add an Instagram badge.  And don’t forget to follow Instagram for business on Instagram. It is very visual and stimulating.

That’s it for now, got to run, I need to go out and get way more photos if I am ever going to keep up!

Next lesson is a big one, “Facebook for Business!”.

Till next week!

 

 

 

 

Alexander, A. (2016, 11 03). Instagram for Business. Retrieved 2017, from Lynda.com: http://www.lynda.com

Babchishin, B. (2015). Safety Hat. Fort McMurray.

Ben Babchishin/Layout. (2017). Music Video Collage.

Horace Kepart, Hunter Library Special Collections. (n.d.). Photo Album. Cullowhe, NC, USA.

Kodak Instamatic X-15. (1970).

Lamb, B. (n.d.). Plumbers buttcrack.

RIPL/Ben Babchishin/Instagram. (2017). Hireed Gun Promo.

Tara Moore, Taxi, Getty Images. (2017).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“link-age: the action of linking or the state of being linked,” AKA Adventures in Social Media Marketing!

LinkedIn1

(Babchishin, 2009)

Guess what this week’s topic was?  Yup, we explored LinkedIn. I have been on LinkedIn since 2009.  I’ve used  almost all social media platforms at one time or another,  I have just never used any of them well.

The actual title of this lesson is, “LinkedIn Profiles for Social Business Success!”(Verdonck, 2017)

I have known for a while, that LinkedIn is widely thought of as a B2B (Business to Business) platform. I have realized that this is probably the best social site for me and my business.

Things to remember when setting up your LinkedIn page are:

-Quantity of connections. It’s true, the more the merrier.

-Quality of connections. Unless the connection is directly related to what you do they might not be the right choice as a connection.

-Participation, you get what you put in. We have heard this before; Social Media Marketing is a two way conversation.

Alright, let’s build it. An interesting fact is that 90% of LinkedIn visitors only go to sites with a picture. This is a tough one for me, the pic needs to be professional and ooze authority. I get that, but I also need to represent my artistic side, it is how I define myself. So with that said, I need your help in deciding which photo I should use for my LinkedIn profile. Below are 3, let me know which one you think would work.

  1. Image may contain: 1 person, beard, eyeglasses and closeup

 

2.  Image may contain: 1 person, eyeglasses and beard

3. Image may contain: 1 person

Next up is the headline. It is important to remember that everything on your LinkedIn profile is searchable. So what does that mean? Yup, your right, you need to make sure you are using the right Keywords.  First up, you need to tell them who you are and what you do. Do some corporate branding or list accomplishments like perhaps you have written a book. And add something personal. Our instructor uses “Chocoholic” and he says “You will be surprised by how often that one starts a conversation.” (Verdonck, 2017)

So in a nutshell:

-Why you.

-Explain what you do.

-Share what you can do for them.

-Use something personal, perhaps thought provoking or a conversation starter. Soon as you have something in common with your connection, the relationship grows. I am still working on mine. For the personal element I thought of “Music Lover-I will judge you by what you listen to!”  Maybe that is a bit harsh?

It is important you fill out every aspect of the LinkedIn Profile. Where are you located, what industry are you in, how do they contact you; email, telephone, DM. Include social media info. Add awards, certifications, or any patents you have. Include projects and list the relevant members of these projects. Talk about any courses you might have taken, volunteer work and populate your sight with rich media. Perhaps you write an article, this gets you noticed. Include photos and video that further your story.  Remember if you share from someone else, make sure to add your own context.  Once you are in your profile the options are everywhere.

I took the opportunity to share a video I did for the Neurosurgery Kids Fund. It was a fund raiser, and I have doctors, nurses and sick kids doing a flash mob/Lip Sync. It was so endearing it opened everybody up to the cause. I am also proud to say, it was such a feel good piece it ended up on Ellen DeGeneres YouTube channel.

https://vimeo.com/109174008

 

(Babchishin, Ben Babchishin)

Next are the final two elements, perhaps the most important parts of the LinkedIn profile. Our instructor asked “What is the element that people screw up, the most?” It’s the summary. You have 2000 characters and need to make them count. You start with your corporate plan and company overview. Be specific about what you do but leave out the details that will come in the experience segment. Explain what you want people to do and tell them what you don’t do.

I am struggling with this because I really like my summary and don’t want to change it. It is a problem with writers; we fall in love with our own words.

 

 

LnkedIn2

(Babchishin, 2009)

I know, I know, I will revise; it doesn’t reflect anything I have been talking about.  It has been  quite an eye opener; I have been on LinkedIn for a long time but hadn’t maximized its power. As I move forward in my social media journey, I will definitely come back and tell you all about what has worked for me and what hasn’t.

The other really crucial part of your profile is your resume.  Your resume should include one or two paragraphs about your company, explain what you do, and why people should get in touch with you. Share your responsibility and your achievements. Talk about your results. Remember Keywords.

We are winding down, but there are a few more things to mention. Everything is about you becoming an expert, a credible source that people want to connect with and who they trust. You might want to consider offering free tips. You can do this in an article. We talked about media rich content. Your articles could be about your area of expertise. Concentrate on your title, use specifics and be concise; you only have 300-500 words. If it is impressive, LinkedIn will share it. Oh and remember, be conversational.

Bert Verdonck the instructor really likes discussion groups; he calls them “the heat of engagement!” (Verdonck, 2017) They become opportunities to answer questions, and build connections.

I started this lesson just a few days ago, and I am surprised by the amount of tweaks I have done to my profile. I added classes, experience, projects, location, contact info and I am still working on my summary and resume.

As I have said before, it is always important to get feedback, so please let me know what you think of this week’s blog and comment on my LinkedIn profile. Feel free to connect.

Next up is “Instagram for Business.” I enjoy Instagram but don’t have a clue how to make it work.

instagram

Till next Week!

 

 

 

Babchishin, B. (n.d.). Ben Babchishin. Retrieved from Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/home/myvideos/page:1/sort:date/format:video

Babchishin, B. (2009). Ben Babchishin. Retrieved 2017, from LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ben-babchishin-dgc-27334815/

Verdonck, B. (2017, 01 30). Linkedin Profiles for Social Business success. Retrieved 10 26, 2017, from Lynda.com: https://www.lynda.com/LinkedIn-tutorials/LinkedIn-Profiles-Social-Business-Success/512777-2.html